Tag Archives: Bacchic orgies

Statement on last article, with Hymns of purification and celebration

Dionysos

Having been many times attacked unfairly for my last article on Hispala Faecenia and Paculla Annia, I find myself compelled to deliver the following statement, in ten points:

1-As a devotee of Zeus, among other Hellenic Deities and Divine figures, I wrote the last article in honor and vindication of Dionysos, who is a Son of Zeus. May I be blasted by the thunderbolts I adore and damned in the underworld I fear if my intentions were not meant for that purpose as well as the common good.

2- It is extremely important to avoid cultural appropriation: If one is not Greek, has no Greek ancestry or comes from a land not historically settled by Greeks, they may pay homage to Dionysos as guests (visiting a friend, visiting Greece, etc.), but to become devoted followers to Dionysos (or what is worse, priests) is unfair to the Greeks, and unfair to their own ancestral Gods. Perhaps the worship of the Roman God Liber (the counterpart of Dionysus) could extend beyond Italy, although I believe that would also acknowledge Roman imperialism. Polytheism is an ethnic mode of religion; tradition and ancestry and pantheon are all connected intimately and inseparably, a rule not made by any man but established by history itself. Don’t be tricked into thinking that a God entirely foreign to your ancestry and ethnic culture can really “call you” to his service. Only ancestral Gods call us, through the blood of our ancestors, and everything else is personal desire and cultural appropriation. If your ancestry in Celtic or Germanic, do not worship Dionysos as if you were Greek, because he had no connection to your ancestors; you should honor your ancestors by worshipping mainly their Gods. This rule applies to everyone.

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Good and bad polytheists (part 10): Hispala Faecenia and Paculla Annia

HISPALA FAECENIA

Dancing maenadIn the late 3rd and early 2nd century BCE, the Roman Republic had been already in effect an empire, reigning over Greeks in the South of Italy, Carthaginians in Africa, and Iberians in Spain. Of all these peoples, the Greeks were the most notable and famous; the extreme renown of Alexander’s military victories were backed by the cultural influence of Athens, Pergamon and Alexandria. Alexander’s empire had indeed brought about a Hellenistic age in which Greek culture was preeminent throughout the Mediterranean and beyond. The traditional Romans were naturally jealous of the Greeks , but they were also alarmed at the looseness that began to creep into their lands. The Greeks, by that time, unfortunately suffered often from a decline of tradition; many corrupt philosophies, all rejecting tradition, were in competition and growth, taking advantage of Hellenistic multiculturalism. The Greeks in South Italy and beyond thus had a bad reputation among the Romans, and not without reason; hedonism and cultural innovation, at the expense of tradition, were marks of the Hellenistic age that the Greeks were promoting. The generally traditional structure of Roman law and culture was therefore in some danger, but never did the alarm go so far as in 186 BCE.

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