Category Archives: Essential distinctions in polytheism

Essential distinctions in polytheism (part 7): Harmonious hierarchy v.s Deceitful equality

egypt-cairo-pyramids-of-giza-and camels-2It is remarkable to notice how modernism, with all its boastful claim to intellectual and moral superiority, resembles monotheism in its brazen hypocrisy and open trickery. The medium for the falsehood and deception is also the same, i.e. language; in both ideologies, there is deliberate confusion and obscurity with terms, rather than distinction and clarity. They always tell you either to interpret something significant in one way, which is according to them the best way, or otherwise to interpret it in whatever way you like, without any direction, as if all interpretations are good. This conversion and subversion, which they create and spread through language, afterwards becomes a real monster (unknowingly to them) that ruins not only their view of the world, but that of others, if not their actions too.

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Essential distinctions in Polytheism (part 6): Evolution v.s Revolution

invazielacuste-1486643891In the first essential distinction, the tree was used as the beautiful emblem of the polytheist in general, and the forest represented community in its collective strength of many trees. Here the emblems will be natural once again, suitable to the topic in hand; nothing can be better compared to evolution and revolution, as notions and modes of change, than the children of the Earth. As all change is inevitable, it remains for us to understand how we can best benefit from it, rather than be swept away by its current. When any polytheist looks back in time, this idea of change is of great concern, considering how ethnic and original religions waned into oblivion; by looking at future time with foresight, a polytheist will also feel a sense of anxiety, as to how this budding religion, painfully restored, will survive and grow on.

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Essential distinctions in polytheism (part 5): Mythology & Ritual v.s Philosophy & Theology


In considering this unusual distinction, it will be useful and indeed necessary to recall the former one on traditionalism and modernism. Since I am a Hellenic polytheist, this matter is of special importance to me and my religion, because it began and spread with my ancestors the Greeks, contributing to the early foundation and growth of what was afterwards called modernism. I will spare no sincerity and honesty in this topic, in spite of the shame that the Greeks might incur for their contribution of certain mistakes and faults that gradually grew into horrible disasters at the hands of others; it is a bitter lesson that the Hellenic polytheists must learn never to repeat, and the rest of the world never to imitate.

It may well shock any reader who knows about the ancient Greeks to hear that philosophy and theology were foreign and whimsical inventions that not only gradually undermined the Hellenic religion, but also paved the way for Christianity to conquer the world. If this seems too shocking and absurd a statement to be true, it is because the world has been taught various falsehoods for many centuries, based on the doctrines of monotheism, and now our minds are still influenced by them. But before the statement can be justified, let us reflect on this provoking question, and then attempt to answer it: If Greek philosophy and theology were really attached and essential to the Hellenic religion, as some say, why did the Christians, of all people, adopt them as the main weapons to weaken the polytheists and strengthen their claim to rule the world? The history of philosophy and theology in Greece is a lengthy one, full of strange details and minute points that can fill many volumes. But for the sake of brevity, it will be necessary to give a general view of its nature and development, otherwise answering the question above will prove impossible. Now, before attempting the answer, it will not be amiss to shock the reader again by stating this little known secret: the history of Greek philosophy and theology is the most eminent (and unfortunate) chapter in the history of monotheism and atheism.

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Essential distinctions in polytheism (part 4): Localism & Regionalism v.s Nationalism & Globalism


In my last writing, I reflected on the topic of nativism and justified it as both natural and reasonable, as it differs from racism. In exposing the contradictions and absurdity of universalism, a set of principles invented and espoused by monotheism and atheism, and in supporting the native distinctions of all ethnic cultures, I hinted at the necessity of curtailing the ambition and uniformity of modern thinking and transforming those into the self-sufficiency and plurality that our ancestors enjoyed and rose by. There are many means by which such thinking can be described and justified, but none is so succinct and comprehensive as the examination of all things in relation to geographical place and political systems that arise in them. After all, it is the nature and extent of the land which determines the habits and needs of a people to survive hardships and advance; all mythologies concur that the Earth, with all her natural endowments, was among the first creations, and the first, in her various habitations, to host man.

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Essential distinctions in polytheism (part 3): Nativism v.s Racism

nospin_2-lgThe word race carries great weight in modern times, but its significance is too often misunderstood, even to the degree of bare contradiction and absurdity. Because there have undoubtedly been grievances during certain periods in history from the domination of one powerful set of people over another, the term racism never fails to raise emotions concerning such events in history, and especially when an instance of it is seemingly repeated nowadays. But the notions of race and racism, since they command and induce such high emotions, have become too sacred for some to reconsider and comprehend, and hence the people who subscribe to the usual definitions and historical lessons on the subject run the risk of being employed as mere tools and servants to fulfill the interests of those powerful and hidden ones who profit or generally benefit from civil disturbances or unregulated immigration. I will attempt to explain this rather complicated case.

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Essential distinctions in polytheism (part 2): Traditionalism v.s Modernism

open hands on skySince I have named my site traditional polytheist, it remains for me to explain the choice of that particular adjective. The word tradition is derived from the Latin traditio, which signifies the action of handing over something to someone. In English, the meaning has shifted originally from something acquired from those before (as oral tradition), to custom itself. But in these modern times, the word custom has acquired a rather unfavorable connotation among many in civilized society, being especially considered as a remnant of Christian hegemony and how it imposed its ways upon the rest of the world by force. Although it is true that perhaps most customs in Europe and elsewhere today derive from Abrahamic religions, a studious eye will find that there are a great many others, practised originally by polytheists, which have escaped persecution and prohibition throughout the years.

It is necessary to make distinctions within this notion of custom to comprehend the nature of traditionalism better and pass a judgment upon it fairly. Any thinking person will agree that custom and tradition in themselves are not bad or corrupt notions, because they represents a very natural thing common to both man and animal, i.e. transferring experience or conduct from one generation to another. Even animals understand that individual experience, without a strong foundation of older experience to support it, often brings about huge dangers and failings that could lead to death. In a human case, custom and tradition are experiences and institutions that are worthy of attention and adherence, because they not only teach us lessons that prevent faults, but also elevate our condition with culture, something which animals lack the mind or means to acquire. By removing custom, we remove culture, and hence, an essential part of ourselves.

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Essential distinctions in polytheism (part 1): Community v.s Individualism

hero-ring-of-trees-looking-upIt is by comparing and distinguishing that people come to know, understand and benefit from things. Distinction is often the essence of learning, for to deepen one’s knowledge in isolated things, without determining how much they differ, is to lose the eye in parts, without gaining the whole. Such a narrow view then leads to mistakes and misunderstandings which can always be better prevented than cured.

Because polytheism at the present time is undergoing a slow and hopeful regeneration, at the hands and in the hearts of many practitioners and well-wishers, often isolated by the force of various difficult circumstances, it becomes necessary to pursue and maintain discussions that can bring about some degree of a common view and good understanding, which are the seeds of community. However, since many polytheists have gone through hardships and isolation in their own experience, they may well be attached to personal views and practices that had supported them.  This is indeed the case, I would venture to say, with all of us, more or less; we are hardened and bold, because we have, like our ancestors, always been taunted and attacked for our ways. But although disagreements among us are bound to occur, nothing can be worse than to allow our personal attachments get the better of our common understanding. If there can’t be harmony, let there be discussion, and if discussion should fail, let there be negotiation. Continual isolation and differences may stifle our budding growth, or what is actually worse, raise a weak and deformed tree.

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