19 thoughts on “Is paganism the fastest growing religion?

  1. SoundEagle 🦅ೋღஜஇ

    Hi Melas,

    Thank you for alerting me to this informative video.

    Considering that this is your first post of 2019, I would like to wish you and your family a wonderful festive season with a special post of mine at https://soundeagle.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/season-greetings-from-soundeagle-merry-christmas-happy-new-year-and-joyful-holiday/

    Happy New Year to you, regardless of how you intend to celebrate it, or whether you celebrate it at all!

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    1. Melas the Hellene Post author

      Greetings SoundEagle and thank you for the kind wishes. To my knowledge the ancient Greeks celebrated the birth of Heracles around the winter solstice, but calendars varied as to the new year. In any case, I look forward to this new year, and why not use it also to propel my efforts towards improvement! Your article is wonderful, most especially the poem. I might be writing poems in imitation of the Greek lyric tradition here. I like the styles of Wordsworth and Pope best, and I think either would be suitable for my purposes.

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      1. SoundEagle 🦅ೋღஜஇ

        Hello Melas,

        Thank you for visiting my post entitled “Season Greetings from SoundEagle: Merry Christmas, Happy New Year and Joyful Holiday” and for your feedback here. It would be very nice if you could kindly give your feedback at the comment section of the post too, as I always enjoy reading your comments and savouring your thoughts and ideas. To save you typing again, you could just copy and paste your previous comment to my post, if you like. Perhaps you could also a poem or two in the comment.

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  2. jim-

    I would guess people are looking for something of substance that doesn’t hijack or try to control the direction of individual spirituality like the big biz, big box religions. Even in Christianity, each is going their own way, picking and choosing the parts they like, not conforming as the group attempts to do. This is how it should be. Each of us is equipped with different physiology and talents, intuitions and abilities, and it makes sense to me there should be billions of appropriate approaches that operate within the framework of secular laws. I’m happy about this swing. The passengers are in charge of the ship!

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    1. Melas the Hellene Post author

      Thanks for the comment, Jim. People are indeed tired of being playthings in the hands of what I call imperial systems of religion, i.e. monotheisms that pretend to ensure salvation and have priesthoods with immense power to herd masses. It isn’t so much about individuality, I think, because while we all do appreciate freedom, we are at the same time attracted to groups and never hope for a lengthy solitude. The point here is how large of a group? Joining a distinct polytheistic community of 100 or 1000 or even 10,000 sounds like something desirable and encouraging, since there are many people you can share with but without the danger of being exploited. Whereas being a Catholic, an Evangelical or a Sunni/Shiite Muslim seems to be quite a miserable thing, because you are one in many millions and that leads to complexes. This is why there is so much splintering and it will only continue as natural. There isn’t one paganism or polytheism but many traditions that correspond to many cultures and ways. Yes, the passengers are taking charge of ships and building new ones to suit their crews and I hope they will abandon and sink the imperial ones in due time!

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  3. Paul

    The fastest growing religion is supposed to be Islam, although mainly from birth rates as opposed to conversion, or so I have heard. The numbers aren’t very big in the case of Paganism, but it’s to be expected that it’s growing. We live in a strange world where different peoples, who are all so incredibly different from each other in nearly every way possible, have been thrown together that it’s a natural reaction for people to pull away from the diversity cult and immerse themselves into what is truly theirs.

    As for fear, I am assuming you mean the “Nazi” element? I don’t take them seriously. I’ve been part of the Pagan world to varying degrees for years and I’ve never come across any. I’ve never gone looking but I’ve never stumbled across any, either, although I am sure they are there. My question would be who are they really – are they people who genuinely believe it or are they people playing dress up to get a reaction? Look at Frank Collin, he was part of all of that and yet was outed for being Jewish. At any rate if one is interested in reviving ancient ways authentically, then they are a very small and poor example.

    As for the symbol of the “swastika” itself which is still demonized these days, it’s nothing to fear as so many seem to and I have no problem with it. Quite the opposite, actually. People have been propagandized falsely for decades now about it, and yet it’s one of our most ancient and widespread symbols (if not the most ancient) and one that people need to awaken about and cast off all of the war propaganda from. In different suburbs here in Los Angeles, you can find old homes, buildings, gates, lamp posts, etc with swastikas on them, actual or stylized. On the street outside here, we have old green metal lamp posts with swastikas encircling the bottoms; they were put up sometime before the last world war (when the symbol was still properly understood in a positive light) and during the war there was a debate on whether to leave them or remove them. They were eventually left as it was deemed too costly to remove them all. I’ve noticed different historical and recreation groups beginning to use it again as well, which is joyous and a very good thing as people can be informed about its traditional and authentic meaning(s) and usage(s). Looking up and using our own traditional names for it, rather than “swastika,” is another step in the right direction, as well.

    Returning to numbers, all I can say is children, children, and again children. Have lots of them. And work towards leading your family and friends towards reverting to their ancient ways.

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    1. Melas the Hellene Post author

      Thanks for the reply, my friend. First of all, you are correct about Islam; I have read somewhere (I think Pew Research) that Islam loses as many converts as it gains, and therefore the only cause of their growth is birthrates. The rate has been in decline among Muslims, as with the rest of the world, but it’s to be feared that Islamism will reverse that reform; even with so-called moderates like Erdogan in Turkey, he is encouraging women to bear more children, which is one of his very evident policies towards a revival of Turkish imperialism. As for the “diversity cult” which you correctly term, it is certainly a poor misinterpretation of what constitutes true pluralistic diversity. Those who adhere to it ought to read more sociology and less ideology…Yet I think (as you know I have often mentioned before) if Europeans wish to lead the way towards reform, they must first set some sort of example.

      The video states that a large portion of those who call themselves “heathen” belong to a far-right ideology, which is cause for alarm. We rarely see them in person, but I have myself come by some of their videos and comments online, and they have been noisy to their fullest extent lately. Their influence is undoubtedly expanding and more or less infecting the whole right, which is very unfortunate, but almost the same could be said of radicals on the left. However, while there is a valid socio-cultural reason for these developments, I hate to see the movement of polytheism in general or Germanic heathenism in particular disturbed by it. The sad truth is that many of these far-right people become heathens ONLY because Jesus was a Jew. Then it’s easy to see that the Germanic hegemony (as in “the purity of all Europeans is Germanic”) is exactly akin to Nazism, being nothing more than a form of it. I hope that this colonial ideology of united “Whites” rather than distinct “European peoples” comes to an end, but how can that be done except from within? Attacks from the outside will avail us nothing and may actually drive polytheists away. The swastika needs to be reclaimed one day, although that is by no means a priority like fighting a bad ideology.

      Thus, to add to your excellent conclusion, we certainly need more children, as well as more education and fortitude!

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    2. SoundEagle 🦅ೋღஜஇ

      Hi Paul and Melas,

      There are indeed many names for swastika.

      In Europe: Hakenkreuz, gammadion, cross cramponnée, croix gammée, fylfot or tetraskelion.

      In East Asia: wàn 卐/卍/萬, meaning “all things” or “ten thousands”, and in Cantonese as “manj” (meaning the 萬 character).

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      1. Melas the Hellene Post author

        Thank you for the information. The symbol is a very ancient one, if I am not mistaken, of an Indo-European origin. It represents the sun and, considering the Indo-Europeans were the first to domesticate the horse, may also be intimately connected to the wheel as a vehicle of change and motion.

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    1. Melas the Hellene Post author

      That link leads to a website set up by a brave Syrian friend of mine on Facebook who follows polytheism openly. Yes, there are surely remnants of polytheism in Islam, including the Black Stone, I have heard. In any case, it is certain that many more Muslims are succumbing to Western and secular influence than to religious fundamentalism. When you see Saudi Arabian women are in rebellion, you know something serious is changing. Islamic terrorism is not so much resulting from a desire to conquer, as from a desperation to reclaim what is being lost. Let’s hope this current battle between extremes opens the way for polytheism to spread as the moderate option.

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      1. K

        It might surprise you, but the far right thing is starting to get me worried too. Granted, I would probably be classed as a far right type myself. Anyone that falls out of line is these days, by now you have run into that several times. I do not like the fascist element. Socialist and statist ideologies are not our ethos. We need not be slaves to some all powerful state. A loose monarchy with a sacred assembly or a kind of republic of freeholders would be better. And no, I do not advocate some European superstate. By commonality I meant common cultural and religious roots which I think are necessary for us to study for reconstruction and moving forward. You took that as a political thing. I actually think that religious practices across the Eurasian steppe and into Europe have an identifiable relation to each other.

        There is also a conflict with the “traditional Catholic” and “Orthodox” factions that are cropping up and promoted by various people in right wing circles. It is partly because of the idea that we need a tradition, and that those churches are “traditional”(unlike Protestantism). The authoritarian, imperial ideologies attached to Catholicism/Orthodoxy(Russia and Rome)are going to attract some on the far right. The heathens(if many get sucked into this) are going to end up in a “war of morality” with them over who can be more edgy and anti-degeneracy. Over who can be closer to Imperial Rome mixed with sharia. There seems to be this idea that any sort of “tolerance” or admission that one does not know everything is tantamount to weakness and incoherence. A dogmatic religion gives answers for everything and demands little thinking, which many seem to want. I have seen some of the Orthodox wannabes and trad Catholics(wishing to repeal Vatican II) around. They often spread lies and insults about our gods. “Tradition” for them amounts to submitting to the authority of their church because it claims such authority.

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      2. Melas the Hellene Post author

        The conflict now between the right and the left is hotter than ever for domination, but the wiser ones, few as they always are, will cautiously take the middle way and bravely announce as well as promote it. Within this crisis of culture and identity, we can see people on both sides rediscovering and re-adopting old principles of a bygone era which they regard as once great; traditional Christianity or fascism in the case of the right, and “pre-colonialism” with communism in the case of the left. It all looks like a perfect combination for instability, even within the ranks of each group, because anger usually gets the better of thinking in these situations of despair. Those on the far right who are adopting heathenism unfortunately in many cases do so for very superficial and misguided reasons: out of hatred for Christianity and anything seemingly Jewish (synonymous with degeneracy in their minds). But they are also changing their clothes as an outlaw does: from Nazism to heathenism. This is where the real danger comes from, since in many ways they are fitting a Nazi discourse and ideas within a polytheistic religion with an ancient mentality that wasn’t polluted by modernity’s ideologies and statism. Hitler is (albeit secretly and indirectly) hailed as a hero by them, just as Bin Laden is by Islamists. Little do they know that Hitler admired Islam because of its warlike ideology that tended to make men obedient to the death- a fine irony there. You are right in saying that a smaller state (monarchy or otherwise) is the solution. I have a peculiar map of Europe that I will be posting with commentary here within the next days. As for “European” unity or confederation (which I believe you are hinting at, because of the common history) I think that is a defensive strategy–why not an offensive one where polytheism is taken outside of Europe and linked with other areas (India, indigenous groups, and even China) to the same end. The term “Europeans” does not make much sense in regard to polytheism (although it would according to medieval history), but since the notion is already there, let’s make polytheism a global movement that can connect various peoples in many distinct places. By sharing with them what we hold dear, we not only defeat accusations of discrimination, but also genuinely engage in a useful and elevated project towards improving this troubled world for all peoples in the service of all Gods. Imperialism stifles its own expansion, for all the profits it can reap, but in our case, universal polytheism can be a decentralized movement and this decentralization is becoming ever more fashionable in a world of people tired of endless battles for hegemony. A perfect opportunity.

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  4. K

    I expect some on the European and American far right to embrace Islam when they realize that it fits many things that they already advocate. The only real problem for them is that Islam is not a “white religion”, but neither was Christianity from the start. I see little difference if it is one Middle Eastern religion or another, so all this Christianity vs. Islam (new Crusade now! and the like) commotion does not matter to me.

    Jesus was a Jew is a poor argument on its own for embracing any religion. I spent some time arguing this at length with some heathens holding this view. I don’t even think that Jesus existed as some historical person.

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    1. Melas the Hellene Post author

      Yes, this “whiteness” that they are immersed within will blank their thinking, if I may use a pun. Their dualism between Europe and the Middle East, very inaccurately constructed as “white vs non-white” makes little sense (except in a medieval capacity) if we think about indigenism, regionalism and indeed polytheism. Let Christianity and Islam fight on until they are both spent and appear uglier.

      Jesus may or may not have existed, and may or may not have been a Hellenized Jew, but as you suggest this does not pass any judgment on the value of the ideas. You can argue almost forever in vain with some Nazis in Heathen clothing. It has been upwards of two millennia of vilification against the Jews and some will never let go because it is quite an easy narrative for their poor brains: blame the Jews for everything wrong (even if whites do the exact same thing), just like the monotheists blame the devil and his demons. And then you have Varg who is even more “ingenious” in stretching that narrative to include all “mixed Southern Europe”. “They” invented civilization, he cries, while forgetting that it was solely “Northern Europe” that took the same to heights no Southern European would have imagined. I have never heard a more fanatic Protestant (in his ideas) masquerading as a Heathen.

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